Luogo - Museum

Museo del Duomo

Where Piazza Gabriotti, 3/A, Città di Castello (Perugia)
Museum of the Duomo Located in Piazza Gabriotti, the Museo del Duomo of Città di Castello stands next to the Cathedral dedicated to the Saints Floridus and Amantio, and with its surface of 800 square meters it is one of the largest Italian museums dedicated to sacred art. Originally the museum consisted of only two rooms, to which access was provided by the cathedral sacristy. Institutionalized in 1991, it has seen its expositive space extended with the opening of 5 other rooms on two floors, obtained from the reuse of space taken from 17 and 18 century sacristies and from rooms in 14 and 15 century edifices that had already belonged to the church. In 2000 the last architectonic intervention extended the exhibition space to 12 rooms, including a large Gothic hall with transversal pointed arches, maybe originally part of a religious edifice, it has undergone a laborious work of restoration like the other spaces. The collection, which was formed with the aim of providing an adequate space for the works of art, property of the Cathedral Chapter and of the churches of the area, is distinguished for the quantity and quality of liturgical items dating from the 6 to the 19 century. Apart from the Canoscio Treasure, evidence of the cults practiced by the 6 century local Christian communities, the collection preserves goldsmith work, among which there is a 12 century Altarpiece and a Crosier top of Sienese manufacture, Chalices, Patens, Monstrances and liturgical Vestments showing the impeccable status of the majority of the liturgical goods ensemble. The Museum is also responsible for the conservation of important documentary evidence of the ecclesiastical history of the town. Among them is the Parchment of Frederick I, The Holy Roman Emperor, also called Barbarossa, literally red beard—with which he took the clergy under his protection—not counting paintings of illustrious artists from outside the area, such as Pinturicchio and Rosso Fiorentino, or local ones like Francesco da Tiferno and Bernardino Gagliardi.

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